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TrinityTurbine
Trinity is a miniature wind turbine to keep your gadgets charged

The Premise. We’ve all been there. Our phones die and we have no access to an outlet. When in public, there’s always the option of trolling for one in a Starbucks, but for those out camping or hiking, there’s little hope.

The Product. Trinity is a portable wind turbine power system. to charge your portable devices. The mini turbine uses a 15W generator that powers an integrated battery, which can also be charged via microUSB on those days without much wind . It has three legs that fold out either into a tripod shape or flat on the ground. Trinity is white and the body is 12” long with 11” legs.

The Pitch. Trinity’s campaign video is bare and simple, going over how the product works. Admittedly, it looks like it was filmed in tent in the middle of the desert. The rest of the campaign goes into the tech specs of this mini turbine for those interested in how it works. Trinity hopes to raise $50,000 in a 50-day Kickstarter campaign.

The Perks. Don’t expect thsi advanced techology to compete with simple pocket power packs. Trinity offers two early-bird specials for backers needing to charge up. The first is $249 and the second is $279. For a regular price, the Trinity costs $299. Higher tiers offer a chance to pick a color other than white. Each tier has an estimated delivery date of January 2015.

The Potential. Trinity joins the sustainability market with several other products aimed at utilizing renewable energy in small ways. The H2Only Battery powers lights with only water. More similar to the Trinity, the WindPax is a portable wind turbine that can be used to run lights or charge low energy devices. Each of these products represents a very cool new way to think about renewable energy. These products, especially the Trinity, introduce this idea on a much smaller scale and show how our everyday lives can be simplified with clean energy. The Trinity, while expensive, is a neat product that will only be elaborated upon with time. It certainly won’t stop with a USB port, but could mean powering larger things with time.

 

Julia Herrick is a freelance writer who recently relocated from Canada to New Hampshire where she works in social media marketing and plays the cello for the Portsmouth Symphony Orchestra.